HARKONNENDOG

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Tuesday, March 07, 2006

Two reviews of CLOWN...

One says CLOWN is great- the other says it sucks... Can they both be right? I don't know... They are here at the same page where you can buy a copy. I'll cut and paste them so you can take a look...

Reviews:

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Don't waste your time by Sam Rhetin
Sat 4 Mar 4:11 am EST 2006

I usually finish every book that I pick up. Even if I don't like something I almost always try and stick it out until the end. This piece of work, if you want to call it that, was one of the rare exceptions. That's surprising for me since the book is only 151 pages. One of the main problems I had with this effort is the careless manner in which the author crafted the character. With so much focus being on the character and his inner thoughts you would assume Theron Marshman would have at least made an attempt to make him at least somewhat believable.

Perhaps this book would have been palatable if it didn't suffer from overwriting. The thoughts and observations of the character should have been more concise. Instead of that, we mostly get a collection of incoherent ramblings about meaningless tangents unrelated to the story or the character. Often, after a point is made the author keeps hacking away at it for no apparent reason. This is one of the (many) reasons why I became impatient and gave up on reading at about the halfway point. Another shortcoming is the utter lack of detail in the surroundings within the narrative. The book is missing dimension in regard to the surroundings of the story and is devoid of ambience which wears thin after a short period of reading.

This book appears to be nothing more than a disjointed story comprised of a collection of thoughts of the author that do not have much substance behind them when combined as a whole. If you're interested in a good read by a solid writer then you'll be very disappointed by Clown.
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An incredible book! I want more! by georgeburkhart
Thu 2 Mar 9:23 pm EST 2006 last modified on Thu 2 Mar 9:29 pm EST 2006
Take "American Psycho" replace the Yuppie with a struggling poet with a less than rigorous skin care regimen, add some brilliant steam of consciousness writing and a pinch of hilarious/insightful (sometimes both at the same time) situations/thoughts and poof, you have Clown.

I'm obviously not a writer, but Marshman is a force to be reckoned with. The bar scene at 1st Ave (Chapters 29-34) is worth the price of the book alone. I love the wide variety of emotions this book takes you on. From a creepy suspense (is somebody going to die?) to laugh out loud comedy (Norman's pickup guide and smelling farts with William) and introspection and despair (Am I living up to my potential/ The Epic?), Clown keeps your attention and leaves you wanting more.
[ Reply ]

I'll let these comments stand without comment, except to say that MOST of the feedback I've received for CLOWN has been more like georgeburkhart's than Sam Rhetin's.

3 Comments:

  • At 4:40 PM, Blogger Eric said…

    Haven't signed up to review the book (I don't know which activity I hate more), but I second Burkhart and recommend "Clown" to anyone. Careful with the cover, though. When I took the book on a plane I made the passenger next to me all squirmy and bothered.

    Hmmmm....

    At least I HOPE it was the book!

     
  • At 2:36 PM, Blogger Harkonnendog said…

    HOLY CRAP thanks man!!! I really appreciate that!

     
  • At 6:24 PM, Blogger Ethan said…

    Clown rocked! Its one of the best books I ever read. I am not a writer, but I did get straight A's in College American Literature, and even once taught it for just half a semester. This book goes right up there with the rest, although in a strange and twisted way. The psychology of Clown is the very thing that should be focused upon. What is it that cracks a man? It is a masterpiece of the otherside of human nature, the side one never honestly dives into.

    -- EW

     

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